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Reports

In 2015, CBAN embarked on a major investigation of the impacts and risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) after twenty years in Canada. Our GMO Inquiry reports are all accompanied by summary pamphlets that you can also download. Find them below or visit the GMO Inquiry project website. GMO Inquiry Cover Pages

GMO Inquiry: Do We Need GM Crops to Feed the World?

This sixth and final report of our GMO Inquiry examines the question “Do we need GM crops to feed the world?” We conclude that, while the argument that this technology can solve the problem of world hunger, or be a tool towards ending hunger, is compelling, it is in fact false. The report includes information from the five other reports of the GMO Inquiry, published over the course of 2015. The research in this report begins to look ahead to understand what role – if any – GM crops and foods should play in the future of our food and farming systems.

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GMO Inquiry: Are GM Crops and Foods Well Regulated?

This report examines how deeply untransparent Canada’s regulation of GMOs, even today. Despite twenty years of critique, Canada’s safety assessment of genetically modified (GM) foods, crops and animals is still a closed-door process that is based on information provided by industry – information that is kept confidential and not disclosed to the public or independent scientists.

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GMO Inquiry: Are GM Crops Better for Farmers?

This report in the GMO Inquiry investigates the impacts of genetically modified crops on farmers in Canada. Have GM crops benefited farmers? Have they increased yields and farm incomes? What are the costs of herbicide-resistant weeds and GM contamination for farmers?

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GMO Inquiry: Are GM Foods Better for Consumers?

This third report in the GMO Inquiry examines the question of benefits for the “consumer” and examines the state of the scientific literature on human health safety questions. The report also discusses the answer to the question Why aren’t they labeled? Genetically modified foods were allowed onto grocery store shelves in Canada without labels, without meaningful public debate, without government testing, and without long-term animal feeding studies.

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GMO Inquiry: Are GM Crops Better for the Environment?

In this second report of the GMO Inquiry 2015, we investigate the impacts and risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) on our environment. Genetically modified crops have been a 20-year open-air experiment in Canada. What are the consequences?

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GMO Inquiry: Where in the World are GM Crops and Foods?

In this first report of the GMO Inquiry 2015, we show what genetically modified (GM) crops are grown in Canada and around the world, where they are being grown, how much of each one is being grown, and where they end up in our food system. The Canadian government does not track this information, but we have investigated. Industry promotional materials commonly depict genetically modified crops being grown widely around the world, but this is not entirely true. In reality, four crops – corn, soy, cotton and canola – account for 99% of global GM acres.

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“Golden Rice” Vitamin A Rice

This 2016 report is a comprehensive examination of “Golden Rice,” so named because it has been genetically modified to produce betacarotene, which the body can convert into vitamin A. Golden Rice is not yet ready for the market. This report provides the history and current status of Golden Rice, and discusses the question of whether it is actually needed to address Vitamin A deficiency.

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The Canadian Seed Trade Association’s so-called “Coexistence Plan” is a gateway to GM alfalfa contamination

This 2013 Commentary and Technical Paper from CBAN and the National Farmers Union critiques the Canadian Seed Trade Association’s “coexistence plan,” designed to pave the way for Monsanto and Forage Genetics International to release genetically engineered alfalfa in Eastern Canada. The Eastern Plan as well as a Western Plan have since been finalized and very small amounts of GM alfalfa were planted in Eastern Canada in 2016 for the first time, but this analysis remains highly relevant.

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The Inevitability of Contamination from GM Alfalfa Release in Ontario

This 2013 report from CBAN presents a detailed overview of the many potential means by which GM alfalfa will contaminate non-GM alfalfa and hay crops, if it is released in Ontario. The biological characteristics of alfalfa conspire to present a particularly potent risk of gene escape.

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Enviropig: Genetically Engineering Pigs to Support Industrial Hog Production

2010. This report provides background on the GM “Enviropig” with discussion of utility and safety. The introduction of the Enviropig was halted in 2013.

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